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20121231
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. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to completely rearrange that, and he came up with you do, one of his generals, to think through belgium, but send the majority of these armored power through the our danforth further south and coming behind any french and british armies that went into belgium once the war started. and this worked perfectly, beginning may 10 of 1940ยป and the british and the french did what the germans expected, asz soon as the germans went
things by naming the child oscar cleveland oscar fulsome had been married and had a daughter, frances. wheatland was a bachelors of cleveland accepted the responsibility and put the child in an orphanage. here's the other part of the scandal. oscar fulsome dies a few years later in a carriage accident. he is thrown from an apparently breaks his neck. he leaves a widow and a young girl frances and globe -- rover leave and make some enormous amount of money and cleveland takes care of the widow and the young girl, pays for them and sets them up in a nice home, best friend and former law partner. he becomes a godfather to little girl frances. they are very close and she calls him on quickly. he calls her frankie. he pacer center to college and she goes to wells college and an age when women weren't really educated. what happened is as frances was growing up cleveland's relationship with her changes from uncle cleve to godfather to a romantic interest. cleveland start sending her letters with poems and sensor roses. it's the full-court press on courting her. he proposes marriage. he's old
and the government's failings in the war in thoroanistan. ...n w well-known face for c-span viewers mary frances berry professor at the university of pennsylvania also of the author of several books. we're at the university of pennsylvania to talk to her about and justice for all. the united states commission on civil rights in the continuing struggle for freedom in america quote. when did this all rights commission begin? >> 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussion with john foster dulles the secretary of state because of the races around the world people would hear about and read about and the fact there seemed to be episodes whether lynching or discrimination in the country. eisenhower said he would ask congress to set up a civil-rights commission to put the facts on the table and i am told by someone at the meeting he slammed the table and they will put the facts on the table. policy is sometimes said up because there is a tough problem is that the report then they go away but in the future would depend on what it found out and how aggressive it was in the public thought about it.
>> next come and interview recorded at university of pennsylvania, mary frances berry shysters experiences on the united states commission on civil rights, set up by president eisenhower in the 1950s senate. this is about half an hour. >> host: on your screen now as a well-known face for c-span viewers. that is mary frances berry, professor university of pennsylvania and also the author of several books, where the university of pennsylvania to talk to her about this book, justice for all. united states commission on civil rights and continuing struggle for freedom in america. mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began and why? >> guest: well, the civil rights commission started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state about the way the united states is seen around the world because of the racism going on, that people would hear about and read about and the fact that there seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether as lynching or some discrimination taking place in the country. so
situation. one part of europe is doing very well. germany, france, northern europe, generally speaking. italy, spain, portugal, greece and ireland, hungry are in terrible shape. serious terrible shape. and because some folks don't pay attention to numbers, here's a chance for a statistic to help. students of mine, professors who came to the united states to study the universities where i taught. now professors at the university of acton, major universities increased. today their salaries as we speak are 40 percent less than what they were in may of 2010. try to imagine yourself in a job that you've kept in which the money you get every week is 40% less. police, fire, school teachers, social workers, you name it. .. governments in france and germany have been very frightened since they too are facing an economic crisis and they too are trying to solve it by making demands of their people to pay for something we come in to. they have chosen to use a very dangerous strategy particularly warm germany and the strategy goes like this. we the government are your friends, you the german workin
money and asked -- it appointed john adams to go to france to borrow, to try to raise money in france from the french government to pay for the revolution. he decided to take his 10-year-old son john quincy adams with him, his oldest, his firstborn, the oldest of his three sons. john quincy adams buy then was a devoted patriot at 7-years-old when his father was in the continental congress. his mother abigail adams heard fire in the distance and she took her boy up to the top of the hill behind in quincy massachusetts so they could look across boston bay and they saw the battle of bunker hill. and she took her boy by the hand, came back down by the farm house and began melting down the family pewter to make muskets for the patriots and she told her son at the time you must rise to the head of your country, and if you don't succeed, it will be because of your own laziness and obstinacy. [laughter] you must make a revolution, resolution in favor of virtue, integrity and love of your country. and that's how john and abigail adams raised their way from the beginning, their oldest son come
to france to borrow, to try to raise money in france from the french government to pay for the revolution and he decided to take his 10-year-old son john quincy adams with his firstborn son, the oldest of his three sons. john quincy adams i then was a devoted teacher yet at seven years old when his father was in the cotton of congress. his mother, abigail adams, she took her boy to the top of the hill behind their farmhouse in quincy, massachusetts and they could look across boston date and so the battle of bunker hill. and she took her boy by the hand became back down to the farmhouse and begin minting on the family pewter to make musket for the patriot and she told her son at that time, she said, you must rise to the height of your country. if you don't succeed, it will be because of your own laziness, slovenliness in austin and this you must make a firm resolution in favor of virtue, integrity and love of your country. that is how john and abigail adams raised her boy from the beginning, the oldest son to be virtue is, honest and to let him serve his country. so when john adams was sen
, killed in france, and it's on the heals of the murder that they begin to enter into power sharing negotiations. with the same machinery that the family believed always killed their brother and who they knew killed their father. that tension was the middle of it. there was a lot i didn't understand at the time. the wind that they took in 1988 was rigged. she deserved a much greater play -- majority, and the army didn't give it to her. the army took an obnoxious amount of time to have her take the office position, again, which she deserved, which she should have been instantly offered at the time. all of these things were happening, and they were confusing to a child who didn't understand why everything wasn't better already, but it was not better because people who were involved in -- people who had very strong roles in the regime continued on in the government. the governor, in a sense, was an appointed fellow whose name was on the death warm, selected by his daughter. >> what was your father's relationship or view of the status in all of this? >> it was tense. she felt it was ver
. oddly enough jefferson really did absorb some of his radical feeling over there in france. and before he left he set down a plan and told people about. he told thomas paine. he told will ensure. a total number of other abolitionists over there when he got back to america he was going to train slaves, who's going to sell them on land as sharecroppers, and the certainty they would become good citizens and free people in the united states. but when he got back to the united states, things changed. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org. >> next, edwidge danticat, a contributor to the anthology, so spoke the earth, talk to booktv about the anthology and aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in haiti. >> well now, joining us here on our booktv set is edwidge ys is danticat, who is an author, and t most recent book is "so spokes the earth: the haiti i know, the haiti i wantto know." edwidge danticat come in thhaiti january 2010, where were you? >> on january 2010 i was here in miami. i was in a supermarket with myus daughter when someone called me and said that there had be
and this daughter i was fascinated with her she was a famous philanthropist in france after row of war one and she legally adopted an entire village from the french government and then north east of france. legal binding document and rebuilt it after the war. the french considered hopeless. she came and took it on and did exist to this day because of her. she was larger than life. she had nicknames for everyone, including the president, she war fabulous hats, and not pretty but very handsome with a commanding presence and worked with the french government. and i wondered as i looked into her life, what would compel this woman in her 50s leading a comfortable life to become so passionately involved to resurrect a devastated village? rewind when eight years old skinnerville was destroyed in the flood and never rebuilt. i began to research the flood as the inroad to the belle skinner story but as i began to learn more about the flood summit william skinner and tell that point* who was on known became alive. he was such a central figure that the papers followed his every move. suddenly i am following
to france, he went to france, decided he fell in love with french architecture and he rebuilt it. when he got tired that he built another mansion outside of lynchburg. then he spent $30,000 on a meal in a canal at the bottom of monticello mountain. said that never really restrained him from anything that he wanted to do. one of the historians who studied, i think it was -- stephen, said if jefferson hadn't decided to make it rather reckless investment of $30,000 in an outcome he probably would've been able to ride out the financial storms of the early 19th century. and another analysis of the financial records show that jefferson, a slaves actually were very productive farmers. and that in one of the first decades of the american agricultural economy, jefferson lost very little money on his farming operation. and so, the slaves were really holding their phones when commodity prices were plunging, and so, i mean and jefferson just kept spending -- the nail in the coffin for him financially was when he had alone with his in-laws. nicholas was speculating in kentucky land acquisitions, and h
. france, at the time, claimed all of canada, the lands around the great lakes, the lands around, on either side of the ohio and mississippi river valleys, down to the gulf of mexico. in 1753, the governor of virginia sent a young major named george washington, and most americans don't know this story. the governor of virginia sent 21-year-old major george washington to fort ducane, a french fort that sat on the site of present day pittsburgh, before the steelerrings -- steelers started playing football there. washington ordered french to leave. french refused. in the following spring, washington returned with troops and attacked. again, most americans don't know the story, but washington fired the first shot in what became the world's first true world war. his attack on the french in the western pennsylvania wilderness grew into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting n
a letter from france saying they are having second thoughts and so jefferson's is i think we do have the power, no problem there. when he was taking the critical steps to preparing us and providing aid to britain in the run-up to the great contest of for liberty in the middle of the 20th century explicitly pointed to the louisiana purchase as a model for the executives in a time of crisis the duty of the magistrate is the line of law but it is not the highest duty with the survival and the success of the country is your highest obligation. one person's presidency is another person's hero. one person's tierney is another person's early and reform. it is a to the excess of power used in a way that we approve and in some generations there's the to be in excess of power used in ways the we would fight to the death against. that's the way history has unfolded in history is on the right side of that. a second term, early second term president might be able to take from jefferson. one goes to louisiana which is jefferson understood the clock wasn't like a normal clock. it moved faster and a
democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over europe and many countries in regions that adopted some type. on april 28, 2011, the chamber of representatives of belgium voted for a similar ban although the law expected to be challenged in a constitutional court. in spain in 2010 the catalonia and assembly narrowly rejected a proposed ban on a burke got in all public places reversing an earlier vote. similar laws are in progress in italy as well. in switzerland after a campaign designed to appeal to fears of a muslim takeover, a popular referendum voted by 57% to ban the constru
commission. mary frances berry. c-span2. start with compared to the union 22. that was a tough road to hoe but if it is not as much paid attention to because 4 million wear black or slave so when it came time to mobilize the not have access to 10 million but a white population of 6 million, half for women and half for under age. the demographics were tough to start. >>host: how many white males? >>guest: i tried to figure out how many of of voting age. that link was pretty tight and with the voting age white men with 18 through 35 by the end it is 18 to 55. >>host: what advantages besides cotton, we hear about that for years what are the advantages? >> as lee said they were overwhelmed by the industrial north of slave labor south than two-thirds of the capital is with enslaved human beings. they had to ship out across the embargo. and then they could list the things that they don't have. with a lot of faith just says they made the united states when it was they could secede to make this other country in independent to build a nation states on the basis of cotton and slaves. they tal
lead shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in a stormy chicago, shriver's name and came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on the flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family still grieving from the recent death of robert raised an objective in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success and repairing the alliance with france weekend by a disagreement about the vietnam war had prompted president nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when the democratic nominee george mcgovern was forced to drop his running mate, and eventually through a process of elimination designated sargent shriver as his choice for vice president. the election was a disaster from the governing shriver who only one massachusetts and the district of columbia. but perhaps the final word came 18 months leader as the watergate scandal unfolded in the bumper stickers appeared today to read an ou
. she was a very famous philanthropist in france after world war i, and what she did was she legally adopted an entire village from the french government in the northeast of france. it was a leading -- legal, binding document. and she rebuilt it after the war. the french were going to abandon this village. they considered it so hopelessly bombed by the germans. and belle came in, she took it on, and it exists to this day because of her. and she was this larger-than-life figure. you know, she called the president of france ray ray, she had nicknames for everyone, and she signed her letters with oceans of love, she wore this fabulous hats, and she was very handsome and had this extraordinary, commanding presence is and worked with the french government to rebuild their country. and i wondered as i began to look into her life what would compel this woman, then in her 50s leading a very comfortable life, to become so passionately involved in resurrecting a devastated village? >> well, rewind. when she was 7 years old, the village which she was born in, skinnerville, was destroyed in a fl
almost 5,000 world war ii veterans. mr joy's story was exceptional. he dropped into occupied france in may of 1944, hit his radio in a box of green beans calm but train occupied -- they set up a save house in france and transmitted some of the most important intelligence of any agent to the 16 for 16 on troop movements, oil refineries, airstrikes, it is incredible. he also was able to rescue hundreds of downed airman. three months ago i got a call that renee had passed away. i interviewed mr. deloitte at his house in 2002 and he was the first person he ever told this story about. is wife was kind enough to give me some teach and was an incredible interview as he brought me back in time. his son told me something very striking. arlington had denied their request for burial because at the time of the war he was a french citizen even though general eisenhower had personally given him the distinguished service cross and he was in uniform, american uniform after the war, he became an american citizen as well as a world-renowned heart doctor who had an incredible things for america. to ma
-care system. >> you did a calculation that showed a health care system, the best in europe or france or germany, we would have no deficit in the baby boom demographics. >> everyone else -- canada is a single payer system but not socialized medicine. medicare for everybody. and is complicated. but it is a mixture of public provision, public health insurance but much heavier hand of government, the same cost as the canadian system but spectacularly good outcomes relative to anybody and britain has a system which is pure socialized medicine and the outcomes are a little better than ours. the cost is 40% better. all of these, if we were able to emulate these things we would be able -- our budget problems would be gone -- and it defies -- one of our two presidential tickets, the signature proposal is to take one of the parts of the system that works pretty well and privatize it. [talking over each other] >> let's make sure nobody gets to do what i did as governor of massachusetts which is privatize medicare. privatize and underfund which is incredible. it is a rejection of both theory and
. about the third or week of august he gets a letter from france saying napoleon was having second thoughts. so severeson says, well, i do think we have the power there, and, boom, it's done. [laughter] franklin roosevelt, when he was taking the critical steps to preparing us and providing aid to britain in the runup to the great contest over liberty in the middle of the 20th century explicitly pointed to the louisiana purchase as a model for what an executive should do in a teem of crisis. in a time of crisis. jefferson himself said that the duty of a magistrate is to the line of the law, but it is not the highest duty. that the survival and success of the country is your highest obligation. one person's imperial president i is another person's hero. one person's tyranny is another person's brilliant reform. part of what we have to struggle with from age to age in america is realizing that some generations there's going to be an excess of power useed in a way -- used in a way in which we approve, and in some generations there's going to be an excess of power used in ways which we
. britain had three, was slowly losing common-law, france, germany and most european states had three, but some european states saw their religious character already beginning to fade. but around the world in africa, asia, latin america, few states had common-law and property rights with titles and deeds. america first came to world prominence after the spanish-american war ended in 1898. at the first time, it's argued that the u.s. acquired an empire with cuba and the philippines. yet, this were only revealed the deep differences between america and everyone else in history. for one of the first things, the american congress did after the war was pass a law requiring the united states to give up the cuba. one searches in vain for major world power to ever voluntarily departed from concord region. at the 20 century gun, a group of liberal elites who embrace the program loosely known as progressivism, challenging, criticized these four pillars. most were hostile to common-law with president woodrow wilson being the prime example of one who thought the constitution needed tv malleable a
refugee from france. he was having his own spiritual dilemmas. and when he encountered her, he saw this incredible spirituality that was sort of, um, unexpressed, and he was able to sort of draw it out of her and allow her spirituality, her mysticism, her deep devotion to jesus christ to sort of help him heal his own doubts, his own spiritual doubts. and i think together there was a confluence there, this spiritual energy, can which i think is a love story and -- on a very high-refined level. it's sort of a divine love that, say, you or i wouldn't be able to appreciate. and they had this union, i suppose, where they sort of circled each other, and he observed her, and i think she observed him. when she died at the age of 24, it was april 17, 1680, immediately after her death her body was transfigured. and there are two written accounts which are in that book right there which were part of her cause that was over in the rome. now, she's already passed away, and she was only 24 years old, and she was a recluse. she only had a couple of female friends that knew her really well but for
that. of the enough jefferson did absorb some of this radical feeling in france. before he left he sat down a plan and told people, he told thomas paine and william short and a number of babel -- abolitionists that when he got back to america he was going to train slaves and settle them on land as sharecroppers in the '70s that they would become good citizens and free people in the united states but when he got back to the united states things change. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> next on booktv, greg gutfield fox news's the five says liberals use manufactured our rage and artificial tolerance to deflect criticism of their political and social ideology. the author contends what he deems smart in tolerance should be used to counter liberal argument. it is about an hour. >> thank you. the first library i have been in where i haven't been asked to leave. i am not kidding, actually. i will get to that library joke in a minute. that was going to be my intro but during the signing nymex so many nice people when i was sitting there and are missing their
, a strange thing began to happen to them. and oddly enough, france is the key to understanding the transformation in jefferson. when you think of france we think of sally and james hemmings. we think of french food. jefferson getting to know french architecture and wind. but he went over there on very important national business. he was there as our trade representative. we were desperate for money. we owed a lot of money. the u.s. owed enormous debts to britain, and our most important export was a slave race car. it was tobacco. which brought in some $30 million a year. now, jefferson had one problem. the most important and influential friends yet in court among the french aristocrats were all abolitionists. and they couldn't understand how we fought a war for universal liberty without freeing the slaves. and they put him under tremendous pressure and they kept asking them kept asking him, when is america going to free the slaves? so he began making promises that america, that emancipation was really just around the corner. he was imminent. we
that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at the very top, you expect politics to sort of try to so much that blow. social institutions to soften that
a letters from her father to france and uncles had put me onto as in that treasure trove of materials, letters from randolph hearst to joseph kennedy back-and-forth on a glimpse of a man who was different from everything i have heard about him and so i told jean kennedy smith at some point that her daughter should write a biography of her grandfather, and if the man was absolutely fascinated. it's a good word to use when you don't know if you are going to be writing about. was fascinating i said and somebody should do a biography about a year later so jean kennedy smith again approached me and said the family wanted me to do it, to write that biography that they recognized there was the need for such a biography. and i said i'm in the midst of writing another book about andrew carnegie and she said when are you going to be finished? we can't say no to the kennedy fisa i don't know, six months maybe. six months to the day we got a call at home from someone i was convinced was a ted kennedy impersonator. i don't know if any of you grew up in new york or listened to don imus. he had a ke
in 1950's. she strove to make as many strands -- france is possible for herself in the country. while her desire to make friends everywhere might've had clinical consequences it arose from a sincere desire to look beyond the dignitaries to the people of the countries he visited. in part because of a connection with our own roots. she never forgot who she was or where she came from. she was the daughter of a truck farmer who had supported herself since she was a teenager. at one point during her husbands administration she told a childhood friend that even though she occasionally felt inadequate to the task that quote she was only -- from artesia, the people she met were so gracious that she felt comfortable continuing important work she and her husband were doing. in addition, since she came from a small town, she understood what a thrill it was for someone to shake the hand of the second or first lady of the united states were to receive a letter from the white house. as a result from her first trip to the second lady or her white house years, she and to the formal dinners and official v
had asked about other countries. france and most of the european union supports book agreement. britain let it go and hurt the publishing industry and that agreement sets prices set and firm and every bookstore maintains the same price. i actually think it kept booksellers in business throughout europe and kept publishers in business throughout europe and provided riders -- >> one of the things really imagining at the moment, it constantly streams up the post -- [talking over each other] >> google and microsoft wanted to get rid of copyright but how can you sustain riders? they can't live on freeze. some of them can. >> partially why we are here. >> i you -- [talking over each other] >> the national endowment and humanities, the attitude to providing finance, publishing and books by copyright. >> we certainly -- for the people that produce literature, the people that produce history, perspectives. we are not in the business of making a llaw and we have an instinct -- supporting the concept of copyright and whether they should last 85 years or longer and what kind of access to d
-governmental partnerships. france and most support agreements and britain latigo and it hurt the publishing industry. that is set and firm. >> are you hot style to that? >> not at all. i think it has kept businesses in business and also provided the riders with the royalties but. >> what is maddening at the moment to say everything should be free? >> this is the divide with kugel and microsoft to get rid of copyrights but they cannot live on she's. some of them came and. >> and biscuits and rice. >> why we are here. >> are you on this attitude was publishing and finance? >> we have an instinct for the people that produce literature or history but we're not in the business to make lot. and we have an instinct wanting to have access. there is the distinction between supporting the concept that is a powerful question. coming from the legislative background of a fairly narrow commercial interest dictated a process added period of time i doubt if exactly the same decisions would pass with today's environment to. if it is pared back we'll be part of the legislators but the copyright to itself should be ma
to beat his yarn by telling what i use this play when i was young. listen to these francs of mine. with great interest, occasionally taken down in his notebook. one day he says to me i am going to put you between the covers of a book some of these days. go-ahead, sam, i said but don't disgrace my name and. that is an interview with the real tom sawyer in october of 1898 so he gave multiple interviews. this is the prologue and this will give you an idea what he is talking about with the steam bath. it was the first times lawyer had ever seen mark twain looking glum. he studied as a journalist. he had fiery hair, long lethal looking cigar and mustache. a lanky man, mark twain did not really what but slouched his way through the muddy streets and back alleys of san francisco. normal dress was careless and disheveled, his clothes were not brushed and freckled with tobacco. at this moment, his chest a forest of matted hair, with one leg link from the arm of a chair, mark twain's eyes blinded like an eagle through sopping browse. this rainy afternoon in june of 1863 mark twain was nursi
at being crosbies house that was moved from frank sinatra because kennedy had been warned franc was involved with some mafia. you can imagine bill o'reilly looking at these names. and everyone knew that president kennedy would sleep with marilyn monroe that night. period. no retribution. how does he know that? he had a source from the london daily mail, a tabloid that had recorded this years ago and confirmed by secret service agent who was at the party but could not be identified. is that verifiable? it is something. sources are important. how he knows he is writing about is important and a popular history losses over that. >> guest: 2012 in general there were conversations of fact checking, corroborating sources, that what you wrote to was true and it brought down general there who writing about neuroscience so the book imagine can now and it turns out he had fabricated one source said copied extensively from earlier writings. as a result the publisher had to withdraw the book and it remains to b.c. -- remains to be seen his career. >> host: "the new york times" best seller li
from both france and in washington sent a telegram to the embassies, which is not far away and i might telegram there was a message from kissinger, secretary of the state department, telling us the israelis, wait. hold your horses. do not take action because kissinger is going to move on with provided doctors. when the telegram was sent from the state department to the embassy during yom kippur, the egyptian and syrian armies were already on their way to destroy the jewish state. that is an example of a mistake because the leader at the time, she was afraid to take a preemptive attack. she was afraid to hold the reserve because she said i don't know what will be the reaction in washington. and dr. kissinger was very strong. nixon was going down, he was going up and she was afraid from his reaction. because of her approach, we almost lost the world. that is why today we do with the issue of iran, we have to take the decision which is good for israel. maybe it will not be popular in the u.n. for sure. everything you say about israel and the standard of the one sponsored by u.s. money of
was france was working with a shiite sect, which is a minority, who were to look after the sunnies, who are the majority. 10% or shias of another sect. assad belongs to this sect ands the military is from this sect and the elite are from this sect. correct? >> partial limit he would not be able to rule if it was only them in the inner circle. >> they basically in control. >> they're dominant in the military apparatus but they have also done a very good job, started under his father. of coe opting many sunnies, christians in particular and others, into the apparatus. >> and the sunni elite, of course. they're trying to maintain power. they're a minority group, against this widening majority who is now getting influence from the outside. please set it up, what are the influences from the outside who are taking sides and how is that affecting? it seems like they're at an impasse. the killingings continue and the massacres are increasing. almost 700,000 refugees in three countries that surround them by january or so. at least that's the projection. people are fleeing but there's a lot more
burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in the future so today we have a united germany that trades immensely with poland and has had a wretch most wall -- to approach what and where the european union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the
could not do what i'd do without fair use but within fair use there is a doctrine called france formative use which you just mentioned and that is a camel that opens into the tent, destroys my mind what fair use is intended to mean and that is what i would call a radical notion of transformative use that you can copy and entire book, not little bits and pieces, you are talking about the whole thing. i think higher courts will resolve that the supreme court has a much more conservative and fair view of fair use that doesn't allow people guiding of fair use. >> i have a fair bit to say here. i would say first of all, when you look at west went on with google and university libraries they simply took it upon themselves. this wasn't a congressional decision. this wasn't a public decision. they simply took it upon themselves to scan millions of books and keep the digital copies with the risk that entailed. one of your comments was when you said paramount interest of end users, that phrase revealed a view of this area that is not right. i think this is a creative ecosystem where the i
of the jews who lived in the arab and muslim countries reside in israel mostly or in some cases france. the other side of the story is the christian communities that did until very recently. to talk about the iraqi christian community. it was about 1 million during 2003 and now it is that 40,000. they have suffered grievous amounts. last christmas with the catholic church in baghdad? "this is it" is a grim subjects but say something about how you approach this in the book. you have done a lot of research of the situation of christians and other countries. but this dovetails that you may not have happened upon. >> guest: right. first of all, i came across a subject when i was at a conference when i was at hudson. i had a blank spot on my calendar and wandered into a workshop. i heard stories of people who have fled the arab countries. it turned into an emotional scene. after the speakers of the panel q&a were people we've been talking about leaving their parents parents, homes, grandparents behind. i had no idea what they were talking about. before israel i read history books and there
canadian origen? president romney said president holland is that i am french. i am the president of france. congratulations president. [laughter] lipstick contains the subjects -- a substance made of fish scales before holland could reply or think of anything to say they were approached by angela marco who looked eager to greet the newest member and president romney said issue your aunt? [laughter] your mother? one this is angela merkle chancellor of germany. chancellor marco looked taken aback when she regained her composure she said to the president on the i know you will have much to add on the debt crisis of the arizona and he looked at the german chancellor and say i say you would go about 140 give or take 5 pounds. [laughter] mia and of ballpark? jim solar merkle whole thing that she misunderstood said i believe the future of the year will dominate our discussions in the coming days. the city that has more herb bridges in any other in the world as pittsburgh. >> congratulations to pittsburg she asked? president romney thought. no. just congratulations. the prime minister of canada it
that was the spiritual refugee from france. when he encountered hurt he saw this incredible spirituality that was unexpressed that he could drop out of her to allow her deep devotion to jesus christ to heal his own spiritual battle. there was a confluence there that i think is a love story of a high-level that we could not appreciate. they had a union they circled each other and they observe each other. she died at the age of 24 immediately after her body was transfigured. she has already passed away and was a recluse with only a couple of the male friends. they started securing. they burned some of her garments to have a tea out of it to and the miracles kept up through the 1760s when the english came to take canada from the french and then it ceased. payback in the 1840's. they discovered her and they got irked manuscripts from the archives. and she started to affect more cures. what prompted the pope to canonize hurt is in the state of washington -- fell down and hit his lip balm the pedestal and was afflicted with the flesh eating bacteria. google his name is jake. there are pictures
from a climaxed during subsequent visits to england and france. in london he attended a gala luncheon with the head of the canadian pacific railway and even better he met sir robert powell, founder of the boy scouts. when he was in paris seesaw around the world in 80 days, a very popular stage version of the novel that had been playing for decades. he watched a copy of the novel being printed expressly for him down in gold and embossed with his name on the cover. he then met jules verne's grandson who escorted him to grandfather's grave. they're surrounded by local boy scouts he later wreath with the message in memory of jules verne, from his greatest admirer . avoided aviation in order to make some kind of point about their place in the world. bicyclist who were not from the western imperial powers began to rebound and the bicycle as a peaceful way to see the world. certain cycle the world from 1901-1904, gathering admiring newspaper accounts as he did so, but because he did not publish his own narrative of the journey, he remained better known within asia and beyond. later pleased t
administration did not take the attitude, we don't care if communism comes to power in france, italy, or japan, as long as there's fair elections, that's all we care about. that was not their attitude. in fact, they were willing to pour covert american funds into political campaigns which, on some level could be seen as prejudice to the free and fair elections, which i think they under correctly to be in the long term interest to preserve democracy and freedom in those countries. we have to rethink the checks we put on our behavior today where we are terrified of having the cia, for example, be involved in covert funding of modern elements in the muslim world, in part, baa we are rightly concerned that cia involvement is impossible to keep secret in today's world of wikileaks, but i, you know, unfortunately, our enemies show no self-imposed limits on them, and out there practice active dollar diplomacy on interests not congruent to our own, and we are standing on the sidelines. it's a lesson that -- this is just one example of many oh i think we are failing to wage political warfare. i only ha
the way up to the recent history of revolutionary france, no republic had ever survived such a calamity as the civil war. and so, the people who knew their history, in the fevered climate of washington d.c. at that time, there was endless talk of the need for a military tater to replace the seemingly bleak lists elected civilian that lived in the white house. mcclellan himself toyed with the idea of. quote, i almost think if i were to win a small success now i could become teeter. he wrote to his wife. and he andy gloried in his newspaper nickname, the young napoleon. he then posed for official photographs with his hands tucked into his tunic. added cabinet meeting on new year's eve, the joint congressional committee on the conduct of the war spent more than 90 minutes asking hard questions about the situation and lincoln's answers left everyone shocked and unnerved. afterwards, attorney general edward bates setup into the night filling page after page of his diary. quote, the secretary of war and the president are kept in ignorance of the actual condition of the army and its intended m
and he was trained in demolition in france by the cia officers, he was trained in the secret writing and he was their greatest hope to assassinate castro. >> he turned out to be a double agent. he was working for fidel castro all along. the cia did not know this. the kennedys did not notice pittard i approved this i think beyond a reasonable doubt. i have sources from the cuban intelligence that sought documents in havana that proved this and there are declassified cia documents that give me the added assurance that he was a double agent working for fidel. he knew there for not only that the cia was trying to kill castro, but that bobby kennedy and therefore jack kennedy or behind the plodding. >> did you ever meet with him? >> i interviewed him in miami a few years ago. he shared some introspection with me. i asked him in particular why did you want to meet bobby kennedy? he told the cia candler by the way, he told the handler i want to meet with bobby kennedy. i want to hear from him that you all have the approval in this plot you have the approval of the highest american authoriti
in his life is this one right here. who is that? >> guest: that's his second wife, frances louisa tracy, whom he married about three years later, 1865, just at the end of the civil war, right after lincoln was shot and the war was concluded. that was an ok marriage for maybe 10 or 15 years. they had four children, who were also in the picture you just held up, but very quickly, it became clear that they had very different tastes and very different instinct. he loved new york, he loved throngs of people, he was a workaholic, he liked activity and travel -- adventurous travel. she was much more domestic and quiet. she liked being home with the children, she wanted to leave new york for suburban new jersey; she wasn't very interested in art, he was passionate about art. so after about 15 years, he kind of kept the atlantic between them. he would go off to europe in the spring and summer with a party of friends and travel around, often--sometimes he would take one of his daughters, and then later, he would take a mistress. and when he came back from europe, he would send his wife abroad in
agile and powerful armed forces in the middle east and had made secret plans with the help of france to become a nuclear power. by the time the united states -- and this is an interesting and important point -- by the time the united states got deeply involved in arming israel in the late 1960s, israel had already defeated the arabs in two rounds of war; the war of independence and suez. and it was preparing to do so for a third time in this 1967 -- in 1967 and was working urgently to fashion it first two french-supplied atomic explosives to use in case something went wrong in that war. the legacy of those zionist revolutionaries who had enraptured the parlors of europe and america is not the light unto nations that the early romantics envisioned. they instead have bequeathed to the jewish world and to the west a highly-militarized dependency, a state that that has failed tog a strong enough institution to balance the military zeitgeist with imaginative and engaging dip diplomacy. this state of affairs, i would argue, represents one of our greatest challenges in the west. why? becaus
. the professor in france is an antiactivist. he has a book coming out about why we should not have cmos. he has a movie coming out about why. >> he was a pro gm though activist. what does that mean? >> okay. so, let's buy it into the details of the study. they use a strain of rats prone to getting cancer, and then invade use a very small sample so you have a control group of ten rats and another group of maybe ten or 20 which have a lifetime risk of getting cancer of around 50 to 70%. okay? so when you design a study where the rats are going to massively get cancer, and you need to have a study that looks at thousands of rats. that's one thing. the idea also that this is the first long-term study isn't true. there have been other long-term studies which said they are perfectly fine. they also have a long-term studies looking at herbicides that said that was perfectly fine the this was in the first time. >> let's assume this study isn't valid, that there is no scientific study here. they were allowed into this country in the 90's. there is no study by the fda. >> if you look back at the restrict
has hold return during subsequent visits to england and france. in london he attended a gala luncheon with the head of the canadian pacific railway and even better he met sir robert powell, founders of voice scouts. when he was in warsaw around the world in 80 days of popular stage version of byrnes novel that had been playing for it decades, he watched the copy of the novel being printed expressly for him bound in gold and embossed with his name on the cover. holds then met jules byrnes grandson who escorted him to grandfather's grave. there, surrounded by local boy scouts he later read the message in memory of jules byrnes from his greatest admirer. adult world circles at at the time a avoided aviation in order to make some kind of point about the places in the world. bicyclists who were not from the western imperial powers for example began to rebrand the bicycle is a peaceful way to see the world. teaching at the morrow for example circumciscircumcis ed a world from 19 1219 four gathered admiring newspaper accounts as he did so but because he did not publish his own narrative that
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